On Jordan Peterson, Religion, & Atheism — Part 5, The Dostoevsky Distraction

The Dostoevsky Distraction

<< Previous, Part 4 — The Deuteronomistic Paradigm

On Fictional Proof

For some reason known only to Jordan, he has a passion for Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment, which he cites repeatedly in several of his talks. For Jordan, the fictional world of the main character serves as a stark warning on the dangers of abandoning Christian values.

From the film Office Space, 1999

On Atheism

As a “deeply atheistic” person, it might be considered impolite, if not downright unchristian of me, to point out to Jordan that:

  • we don’t advocate (as far as I know) that others have no intrinsic value; or,
  • that people can do whatever they want, whenever they want
From the film, Austin Powers (1997)

On the Bait and Switch

On the list of logical fallacies, where does appeal to a fictional character fall? This is right up there with the evangelical appeal to The Flintstones in refuting evolution.

From the TV show, Frasier (S01E23)

Jason (Diogenes of Mayberry) covers the backstory of Judeo-Christian doctrines to refute evangelical literalism related to socio-political action.